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Archive for the ‘Visualisation’ Category

Self-Service BI Mapping with Microsoft Research’s Layerscape–Part 2

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In my last post I showed how to load data from Excel into Layerscape, the new data visualisation tool from Microsoft Research; in the post before that I showed how to load UK weather data from Windows Azure Datamarket into PowerPivot. Now let’s take that weather data and plot it on a map!

When doing this, the first decision I made with this data was about what to show. The main problem is that the data volumes involved here are very close to the upper limit of what Layerscape is able to handle: in a few cases I crashed Layerscape, but that was when I was trying to load around 150000 rows of data into it; I found that just over 110000 rows of data was ok however. As a result I made the decision to only show data for cloud or rain, not sun (which is ok – if you want to visualise a clear day, you don’t want to show anything on a map I think) or mist or fog (which I was less happy about).

To achieve this I created a calculated column on my Three Hourly Forecast table in PowerPivot called Cloud with the following definition:

=if([SignificantWeatherId]>=7, TRUE, BLANK())

Then, after having created a flattened PivotTable with the data I wanted to display, I dropped the Cloud field into the Values box in my PivotTable and was able to filter it to only show Weather Stations and time periods where there was cloud:

SNAGHTML31b117d

I also created a few other calculated columns:

  • ActualPredictionForStart and ActualPredictionForEnd: the former is mentioned in my previous post, and the latter returns a value three hours after the former:
    =[Date] + (([TimeStep]+3)/24)
    These two values represent the start time and the end time for each row in the Three Hourly Forecast table.
  • WeatherDepth: in the Significant Weather table there’s a distinction made between low-altitude cloud and high altitude cloud, and in LayerScape when you’re plotting data you can control how high off the ground a point is displayed, so the WeatherDepth column contains some fairly arbitrary numbers for cloud altitudes based on the [Code] column. Here’s the definition:
    =SWITCH([Code], 5, 150, 6, 150, 7, 100, 8, 120, 10)
  • WeatherColor: again, in Layerscape you can control the colour of your points and their opacity, which again is useful for displaying dark/light and thin/thick clouds. The only compromise I had to make was to display dark clouds (ie where clouds are described as either black or where the weather is rainy or snowy) in blue rather than black, because I couldn’t get Layerscape to display black – white clouds are shown in white.  To calculate WeatherColor I created two intermediate calculated columns on the Significant Weather table, InitialColor (which contains colours for weather that I’m not displaying in this demo – I thought dust storms should be shown in yellow for instance):
    =SWITCH([Code], 1, "yellow", 2, "white", 3, "yellow", 4, "yellow", 5, "white", 6, "white", 7, "white",  8, "blue", "blue")
    …and Opacity:
    =SWITCH([Code], -99, 0, 0, 0, 1,10, 2, 25, 3, 10, 4, 100, 5, 25, 6, 75, 7, 50, 8, 50, 9, 60, 10, 60, 11, 60, 12, 65, 13, 75, 14, 75, 15, 80, 90)
    …making the definition of WeatherColor:
    =[Opacity] & "% " & [InitialColor]
  • Depth and Color: calculated columns on the Three Hourly Forecast table that copied the WeatherDepth and WeatherColor values down to the main fact table:
    =RELATED(‘Significant Weather’[WeatherDepth])
    =RELATED(‘Significant Weather’[WeatherColor])

This screenshot gives you some idea of the values that the depth and colour calculations return:

image

With this all done I was able to load the data into Layerscape in the way I showed in my previous post, tweak some of the settings for the markers and time decay, and come up with a nice-looking visualisation. The big difference in this case compared to my previous examples is that here we have time series data and Layerscape is able to show values changing over time. The only thing I needed to do to make this happen was to check the Time Series box in the Layers pane on the main screen; with this done I could show the data for a particular point in time or let Layerscape cycle through time showing how the forecast weather changed.

image 

With that done, was able to save my demo as a very basic guided tour and upload it to the Layerscape site from where you can download it yourself :
http://www.layerscape.org/Content/Index/620

I also created a video showing the tour:

 

I’m quite happy to admit that this tour doesn’t show off the full capabilities of Layerscape (I’m not sure my graphics card is up to the job, frankly) and I’ve not taken much time to ensure that the visualisation is as accurate as it could be, but I’m still quite proud if it!

Written by Chris Webb

April 18, 2012 at 4:35 pm

Sparklines for Excel

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While the introduction of native support for sparklines and other microcharts in Excel 2010 was welcome, Excel is still lacking more advanced visualisation features. I came across Sparklines for Excel – a free Excel addin that gives you a lot of extra charting options, not just sparklines – a while ago but I’ve only just got round to playing with it and I have to say it’s a lot of fun. I’m not much of a data visualisation expert (I’ll leave that to the likes of Jen) but it’s a subject that every BI professional needs a passing knowledge of and in any case it’s a shiny new toy to play with, so it’s worth a blog post.

What I like most of all about Sparklines for Excel is that everything is driven from Excel formulas, and no VBA is required. That means you can make every aspect of the charts you create data-driven, and this holds a fundamental appeal for the data geek in me.  Let’s take creating a treemap as an example, and start with an Excel 2010 worksheet hooked up to the Adventure Works cube using some Excel cube functions plus some thresholds telling us whether the values for Gross Profit Margin are good or bad:

image

We can then simply click on an empty cell and then click on the Treemap button in the ribbon, fill in some ranges, and we get the following formula:

=Treemap(D5:D10,C15:I29,,,E5:E10,G5:H9,C5:C10)

And this treemap in the worksheet (I won’t even try to apologies for the colour scheme):

image

Cool, eh? And of course, as soon as you change the dropdown filter to select another year, or change any of the threshold values, the treemap updates too. Even the position, length and width of the treemap itself can be parameterised.

You can see the full list of chart types – including heat maps, cascade charts and Pareto charts – in the manual here. It’s definitely worth checking out if you’re an SSAS or PowerPivot user who’s into data visualisation and on a tight budget.

Written by Chris Webb

November 30, 2011 at 5:52 pm

Posted in Excel, Visualisation

Interactive Information Visualization

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Here’s some more interesting work coming out of MS Research, this time in the area of data visualisation:

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/news/headlines/visualizations-061511.aspx

I’d love the see this demo (why not record it and put it online somewhere…?) – iSketchVis in particular sounds cool. It’ll be interesting to see if any of this work makes it into Crescent any time in the future…

Written by Chris Webb

June 16, 2011 at 5:44 pm

Posted in Visualisation

Analysing SQLBits 7 Data, Part 1: Session Selections

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As I’ve said before, I’m involved with the organisation of the SQLBits conferences here in the UK and at the moment the SQLBits committee is busy preparing for SQLBits 8 in April (make sure you come – it’s going to be great!). This eats up a lot of my spare time – spare time that I usually spend blogging – so I thought I’d kill two birds with one stone and blog about some of the BI-related stuff I’m doing for SQLBits (I’ve done this before but there’s plenty more mileage in this subject). It turns out a lot of the things SQLBits needs to do requires classic ‘self-service BI’: solve a business problem as best you can with whatever data and tools are to hand. It’s good to see things from the end user’s point of view for a change!

First of all, let’s take a look at scheduling: how can we make sure that we don’t run two sessions in the same time slot that are interesting to the same type of attendee? If attendees are put in a situation where they are forced to choose between two sessions they want to see they won’t be happy – we want to be able to create a schedule where there are as few difficult choices as possible. Unfortunately we don’t collect data about which sessions attendees actually go to, and even if we did it would be no use because of course by the time the session runs it’s too late to fix the agenda. However, well before the conference we allow people to vote for the ten sessions out of all those that have been submitted that they’d like to see (voting has just opened for SQLBits 8, incidentally), and we use this data to help us decide which ones make it onto the agenda; we can therefore use this data to help avoid overlaps.

This data can be visualised very effectively using NodeXL. To do this, I ran a SQL query on the SQLBits database that gave me every combination of two sessions that had been picked by the same user, so for example if a user had selected sessions A, B and C my query returned the pairs A-B, A-C and B-C. This gave me my list of edges for the graph and for the size of the edges I used the number of times the combination of sessions occurred, so I could see the most popular combinations. Unfortunately with 107 sessions on the list and thousands of edges, I got something that looked like one of my four-year-old daughter’s scribbles rather than a useful visualisation, so I decided to filter the data and look at one session at a time. Here’s what I got for my session ‘Implementing Common Business Calculations in DAX’:

nodexl1

Still not great, but at least with the thicker lines you can see where the strongest relationships are and when you select these relationships it highlights them and the nodes on either end, so you can read the names of the sessions. I then realised you could use the ‘dynamic filters’ functionality to filter out the weaker relationships, making it even easier to pick out the strongest ones:

image

So we can now see that the strongest relationships were with the sessions “You can create UK maps with SSRS 2008 R2” and “Data Mining with SQL Server 2008”. I’m still getting to grips with NodeXL which, I have to say, I like more and more and which deserves more visibility in the MS BI world.

Anyway, since this is a basket analysis problem I also thought of using the Data Mining Addin for Excel, but since I have Office 2010 64-bit I couldn’t. Luckily though the nice people at Predixion do have a version of their addin that works on 64-bit, and they gave me another eval license to use on my data. Getting useful results out of Predixion turned out to be ridiculously easy: I just copied the raw data into Excel, clicked the ‘Shopping Basket Analysis’ button on the ribbon and it spat out a pair of nicely-formatted reports. The first shows ‘Shopping Basket Recommendations’, ie if you select one session it recommends another one you might like:

image

And the second shows the most commonly-occurring ‘bundles’ of sessions that were picked together:

image

It almost feels too easy… but I think you can see that the results look correct and to be honest it’s much easier to do something useful with this than the NodeXL graph. When we close the voting for SQLBits 8 I’ll repeat the exercise and hand the results over to Allan, who’s in charge of speakers, and he’ll be able to use them to put together our agenda for Saturday April 9th.

Written by Chris Webb

February 2, 2011 at 10:14 am

Posted in Data Mining, Visualisation

Tagged with , ,

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